Microfinance to "return the economy to health"
Friday, March 20, 2009 at 07:16PM
Melody in Kiva, Microfinance, Mohammed Yunus, Peer-to-Peer Lending, microplace, p2p lending, peer-to-peer

Mohammed Yunus, Nobel Prize winner and founder of Grameen Bank, the first microfinance institution, has a suggestion to help lift the world out of the current crisis: microfinance loans. He made his name lending small sums of money, less than $2,000 to poor women in Bangladesh, but he sees hope in extending the concept through the developed world.

As covered by Forbes Magazine, during recent remarks at the Foreign Correspondents Club of Japan in Tokyo, Yunus "cites a program his bank started last January in New York City's Jackson Heights section, a low-income neighborhood in the borough of Queens that is home to many immigrants. Grameen America disburses loans averaging a paltry $2,200 to women there. Although New York has been hit hard by unemployment tied to the financial turmoil, Grameen's repayment rate there is still 99%, Yunus says: "In the same city where big banks collapsed, we're untouched by the crisis."

Yunus believes that microcredit could  spread across the United States as big banks contract. Grameen has attracted the interest of Susan Buffet from Berkshire Hathaway and is considering opening up branches in several U.S. cities. He hopes that microcredit can eventually replace payday loans and check-cashing shops: "Although we live in a world where we deal with billions of dollars down the block, people are looking for much smaller sums."

If you're interested in being a lender to international microfinance institutions, try out two peer-to-peer sites, Kiva.org and microplace.com.

If you're interested in being a peer-to-peer lender domestically, see our review of all the major players. Soon-to-come is a site directly focused on the payday loan market, YadYap.

Article originally appeared on (http://transcapitalist.com/).
See website for complete article licensing information.