Entries in Wikipedia (2)

Tuesday
Sep212010

The Iraq war Wikipedia entry: A case study in real-time history

James Bridle at booktwo.org released an amazing project and reflection this month: a consideration of how Wikipedia provides "a framework for understanding how knowledge came to be and to be understood" illustrated through the printed and bound collation of all edits made to the "Iraq War" entry over 5 years. It is amassed in 12 volumes, or what looks to be about the size of Encylopedia Britannica in its entirety.

It's a terrific way to visualize the power and impact that is Wikipedia - our collective consciousness and knowledge of information. But it also highlights the an ideological debate about history that the continual editing format of Wikipedia offers.

Click to read more ...

Tuesday
Aug252009

Sensorpedia connects sensor data through web 2.0 platform

Counting down to Tap the Collective, the collective intelligence event we are co-sponsoring with Inkling Markets next week, 9/2 in Washington, DC, we're going to profile the great CI projects that will be featured at the event.

Sensorpedia

Mark Drapeau wrote yesterday in the Federal Times,

"The proliferation of social software in society at large has important ramifications for U.S. national security. Governments that harness its potential can interact better with citizens, anticipate emerging issues, and tackle tough internal problems."

A great example of leveraging social software for improved homeland defense is Sensorpedia, a project at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Sensorpedia connects sensors composed of various standards through a Wikipedia-like platform with three important distinctions: links to near-real-time, streaming data; support of  interactive mashups; and restriction of authorship to approved personnel. Nearly all types of sensors are targeted for inclusion: smoke detectors, intrusion alarms, weather sensors, video cameras, cell phones, global positioning systems, seismic sensors, acoustic sensors, chemical sensors, radiological sensors, pressure gauges, medical instrumentation, telemetry systems, home security systems and alarms.

The richness of the data connected from the sensors together could give powerful early warning of disasters, improving our nation's preparedness, security and emergency response. Currently, this sensor data is disparate, reported to diverse entities or not reported at all, forming an incomplete picture of the environment. With Sensorpedia, Local, state, and federal public safety officials, intelligence analysts and planners, and emergency response workers can tap into centralized sensor information to better connect the dots and inform their planning and decisionmaking.

We're thrilled to hear developer David Resseguie from Oak Ridge National Laboratory give us a first hand discussion of Sensorpedia -- including Q&A where I can bring up my privacy concerns -- next week.

Flickr credit : Admit One